Monday, 21 July 2014

Arthritis Friendly Recipe: Quick Caramel Mousse

Do you ever find your arthritis very, very boring? I'm so over mine at the moment. I'm enjoying playing with my 5 month old daughter and discovering things through her eyes and, frankly, I don't have the time for sore wrists, hips or feet. It's enough to make me want to cry like a baby! 

One way of tackling the frustration has been to concentrate on eating well and having fun. The two don't always go hand-in-hand, but I know that when I eat well and relax well I'm more able to cope with arthritis pain.

This caramel mousse delivers on both counts. It's relatively healthy and fun to make. It's full of calcium-rich greek yoghurt, low in fat and contains much less sugar than a commercial product. Calcium is so important for those of us with arthritis: It helps safeguard our bones and may even delay the progress of osteoarthritis in women, although not men (!), according to a recent study. Eating plenty of low fat dairy products, pulses, sesame seeds and fortified non-dairy products is the best way to meet your calcium needs or, for a change, you can try this fun caramel mousse. 

Ingredients:

500g 2% fat Greek yoghurt (choose a brand with a firm 'set')
2 egg whites (if you are on immune suppressants, like me, then I recommend using the pasteurised kind that comes in a carton)
1 tablespoon light brown soft sugar
1 tablespoon golden syrup (or you can use molasses or treacle for a stronger flavour)
1tsp vanilla extract

Serves 4

In a large bowl, gently fold the sugar, syrup and vanilla extract into the yoghurt until everything is just combined. Don't overmix.

Whip the egg whites until they form stiff peaks and then fold these into the yoghurt mixture. 10-12 folds should do it!

Divide the mousse mixture between four glasses and leave to chill for 2-3 hours before serving. This is best eaten on the day it is made otherwise it will begin to separate.

Friday, 4 July 2014

Arthritis Diet Friendly Recipe: Full of Beans Fish and 'Chips'

Would someone please explain to me where the phrase 'full of beans' comes from? It's an odd English way of saying someone is bursting with energy, but I've always wondered how anyone came up with it. Is it because beans are such tiny little powerhouses of nutritional goodness that they leave you with a spring in your step? Because, whilst they are, they seem to more often have a reputation for being bland, boring and basic. They don't need to be. Roasted like this the humble cannellini (or navy) bean becomes both creamy and crispy. Add some arthritis fighting fish to these roasted beans and you have the healthiest one-pan version of fish and chips you will ever come across - I guarantee it will leave you feeling 'full of beans'!

A few notes on the ingredients, I use frozen fish fillets as they are both economical and convenient. If you want to use fresh fillets, simply add them nearer the end of the cooking time.

Ingredients:

2 sustainably sourced frozen white fish fillets
400g can tin of cannellini/navy beans (250g drained weight)
2 small sweet peppers
1/2 tsp paprika (I used smoked paprika)
1/2 tsp dried garlic
1/2 tsp cumin
1 tablespoon olive oil, plus a little to drizzle over the fish.
Black pepper and parsley to season

Serves 2

Roughly slice the peppers into strips and place in a roasting dish with the drained cannellini beans.

Add the oil and spices to the dish and give everything a quick mix together.

Place the fish fillets on top of the spiced beans and peppers and drizzle with a little extra olive oil

Bake at 180C/375F for 20-25 minutes or until the fish is opaque and flakes when gently speared with a fork. The peppers should be softened and the cannelinni beans crispy around the edges.

Garnish with freshly ground black pepper and parsley to taste and serve immediately.

Arthritis diet notes:
Cannellini beans are bursting with folate, iron and magnesium - all micronutrients that are particularly important for people with arthritis. Patients with all types of arthritis are often deficient in folate (folic acid) and iron due to poor diet, the nutritional consequences of chronic inflammation and drug-nutrient interactions (see this post for more details). Magnesium is essential for strong bones and can also help alleviate muscle cramps.



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